A Podcast of my Own

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Looking back at this blog I’ve come to realize I’ve participated in a lot more podcasts than I thought.

I’m a big fan of the medium, and it’s been part of my daily media consumption for years. I personally prefer it to radio for news, keeping up to date on the industries and hobbies of interested and I always wanted to have my own.

This summer Tara and I finally started one, and I quickly saw that podcasting is a lot harder than it seems, sure talking is easy. Figuring out what to talk about, making it interesting, sound right and saying things clearly all while making sure to release it regularly is something that is easy to take for granted as a consumer.

Tara and I both advocate for our brand publishing clients to create content, so it makes sense for us to eat our own dog food. It’s a big reason Tara is committed to her YouTube series Truly Social which just surpassed 100 episodes!

Our podcast is called Truly Social Podcast, we try to release a new episode every two weeks. In it, we discuss all things that affect our lives as content and online audience strategist.

Our latest episode released this week is called ‘Why Branded Content Fails’ and addresses branded content and why a lot of it misses the point.

It’s available on all popular podcatchers by searching Truly Social Podcast but you can also find all episodes on our site.

We’re just getting started, as with any creator I see all the mistakes I’m making with each episode, but I’m committed to keeping it going, learn and get better at this.

 

The YouTube Revolution – PBS Off Book

PBS’ Off Book YouTube series latest video hits close to home and features what I consider the pionners in digital entertainment, how they use YouTube and engage directly with their audience to learn and grow. The big broadters are definitely watching this and most still don’t understand that YouTube is not like TV, it allow a two way conversation going that they don’t seem to get or comprehend.

Over the past 8 years, YouTube has given birth to an increasingly sophisticated entertainment culture that operates outside of the traditional television and film ecosystem. With humble roots in charismatic and creative people simply sharing their lives, thoughts, and humor to their webcams, YouTube entertainment has diversified and grown into tens of thousands of unique channels with millions of loyal fans and subscribers. With a new generation of viewers increasingly turning to YouTube instead of broadcast TV, a new industry is being built around personalities who have dissolved the barriers between on-screen talent and the audience, and who employ visual aesthetics that make the viewer feel as if they are a part of the creator’s life. Truly, we are in a new era of entertainment, one being led by millions of young people who are equally happy to watch video on their laptop as they are on their TV.